Protecting the planet: Earth club springs into action

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Protecting the planet: Earth club springs into action

Mila Sajovec, Olivia Wexler, and Jenna Muehleck (left to right) are the co-founders of the newly-formed Earth Club.

Mila Sajovec, Olivia Wexler, and Jenna Muehleck (left to right) are the co-founders of the newly-formed Earth Club.

Mila Sajovec, Olivia Wexler, and Jenna Muehleck (left to right) are the co-founders of the newly-formed Earth Club.

Mila Sajovec, Olivia Wexler, and Jenna Muehleck (left to right) are the co-founders of the newly-formed Earth Club.

Fires across Australia. Rising sea levels. Species disappearing.

With environmental disasters raging across the globe, environmental issues seem too big to solve. Three NCHS juniors are aiming to change that perception, working to make small but meaningful changes in our community.

Jenna Muehleck (‘21), Mila Sajovec (‘21), and Olivia Wexler (‘21) are the team behind Earth Club, a new organization that hopes to “spread awareness for people in the community and especially in our school [about environmental issues],” said Muehleck, who serves as the group’s vice president.

This awareness is much needed according to club sponsor Mr. Mike Roller, who runs NCHS’ recycling program. Even beyond recycling, “[environmental] education needs to be a huge part of making a difference,”  Roller said.

Roller has long “been passionate about environmental issues,” but needed interested students to make the organization a possibility. That’s what excites him about the trio, who he described as “strong student leaders.”

In addition to raising awareness, the group hopes to open people’s eyes to the many environmental challenges that they create each day. At their first meeting, they’ll be using a program that, “based off all the choices you make in your life, [lets you] find exactly how much you’re going to be affecting the environment,” said Muehleck, adding that “it’s a really good way to visualize how your lifestyle may be problematic.”

Additionally, they plan to host volunteering events according to Sajovec, with a focus on showing how people can make a real difference with just a Saturday afternoon’s worth of effort.

Earth Club’s first meeting is scheduled for January 13, and through educating students and staff alike, they hope to create “a family that helps each other learn and grow,” Wexler said.